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Torture within Quranist Viewpoint (6): The Disbelievers and Their Asking for the Infliction of Torture/Torment in This World
À propos de notre émission YouTube «Quranic Moments»: Un appel addressé à nos chers coranistes
The Interview of Dr. A. S. Mansour with Al-Arab Newspaper
Bush's appointment to the Organization of the Islamic Conference.
Is It Possible to Reform the KSA?
Appointment with life
Swiss Banks Must Return The Money To The Mother Country Of The Client
The Notion of Descendants of Muhammad's Household Is a False, Hateful, Racist One of Disbelief
We Command its Affluent Ones, They Transgress in it! ( The Holy Quran : 17:16)
On the Ordeal of Changing Oneself to the Better
The Quranic Phrase (For The Cause of God) within the Dealings among People in this World and within the Last Day
The Sunnite Notion of the So-Called Followers and the Followers of these Followers
A Response to the Previous Article Titled: (My Father Is My Problem!) from the Father who Writes (I Am Not the Problem, I Am the Victim!)
The Destruction of Al-Saud Royal Family Because of Their Repelling Others Away from God's Path (2)
Harut and Marut
Envy Is a Dangerous Heart Disease
Mental illness and the Will
Rules, Rules, and more Rules
The ISIS Caliphate and the Churches
Fatwas Part Ninety-Five
Increasing Transparency in Governance in the Arab World

CIMA Event: Wednesday, October 28, 12-2:30pm - Increasing Transparency in Governance in the Arab World

 

       
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The

 

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The

 

 

 

Center for International Media Assistance at the National Endowment for Democracy and

 

 the International Research & Exchanges Board invite you to a luncheon discussion of

 

 

 

Increasing Transparency in Governance in the Arab World:

 

The struggle to create a right to access to information

 

 

 

 

 

Featuring:

 

 

 

Richard Winfield

 

The International Senior Lawyers Project and

 

CIMA Advisory Council Member

 

 

 

David McCraw

 

The New York Times

 

 

 

MPAli Ashal, MP Sakhar Al Wageh

 

Yemeni Parliamentarians Against Corruption (YemenPAC)

 

 

 

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

 

12-2:30 p.m.

 

(Lunch served from 12:00–12:30 p.m.)

 

 

 

Discussion will be held at IREX main offices

 

2121 K Street, N.W., Suite 700

 

Washington, DC 20037

 

It is NOT at CIMA/NED

 

 

 

RSVP (acceptances only) with name and affiliation by Monday, October 26

 

to CIMA@ned.org

 


 

 

Greater media freedom and access to information is a cornerstone to good governance and fighting corruption. There are generally accepted common core characteristics of freedom of information laws necessary for them to operate successfully:

 

 

 
  • Presumption of openness to public information
  • Exceptions to be narrowly defined
  • Clear enforcement and independent appeal systems
  • Protection where matters are disclosed in the public interest

 

 

Most Arab countries do not have a regulatory framework that meets these criteria.  Although Jordan established the first access to information law of its kind in the region in 2007, working journalists have been critical of its implementation.

 

 

 

With support from IREX and the Middle East Partnership Initiative, the International Senior Lawyers Project has been providing assistance to parliamentarians and civil society activists throughout the Gulf region to support their efforts to develop freedom of information laws and increase transparency and accountability in their societies. 

 

 

 

About the panelists:

 

 

 

Richard N. Winfield serves of counsel to Clifford Chance US, LLP and leads the media law reform projects of the International Senior Lawyers Program, which he co-founded in 2000. Since 2002 he has taught courses in comparative mass media law and American mass media law and Internet law at Columbia Law School and Fordham University in New York City .  Since 2006 he has served as Chairman of the World Press Freedom Committee.  For more than three decades,  Winfield served as general counsel of the Associated Press (AP) while a partner in the New York law firm of Rogers and Wells, which became Clifford Chance, LLP.  There he defended the AP and other media clients in many hundreds of press freedom cases in the United States and abroad.  Winfield’s articles on freedom of expression have appeared in the Journal of International Media and Entertainment Law, Communications Lawyer and other legal publications.

 

 

 

David McCraw is vice president and assistant general counsel of The New York Times Company, where he is responsible for litigation and for providing legal counsel to the newsrooms of the Times, The Boston Globe, The International Herald Tribune, and the company's other 15 newspapers as well as its Web sites.  McCraw serves as lead legal counsel in the Times's freedom-of-information litigation and has represented the newspaper in FOI lawsuits dealing with the U.S. government's secret program to tap phone calls without warrants, the City of New York's emergency response on September 11, and the U.S. government's database of unsafe workplaces.  He previously served as deputy general counsel of The New York Daily News and a litigation associate at Clifford Chance and Rogers & Wells.  He has lectured on U.S. press law in Jordan, Yemen, Peru, and several Eastern European nations.

 

 

 

Ali Ashal  is a member of parliament from the Islah Party..  He is head of public relations and advocacy for the Yemeni Parliamentarians Against Corruption and a member of the Oil and Development Committee.  He has served in parliament since 1999. Ashal submitted the access to information bill to parliament.

 

 

 

Sakhar Al Wageh

 

Sakhar Al Wageh is an independent member of parliament and head of the Yemeni Parliamentarians Against Corruption.  He graduated from Sanaa University with a degree in law and Sharia.  He has been an MP since 1993.  He is a member of the Oil and Development Committee and has major roles in countering corruption.

 

 

 

Salem Bintalib (tentative)

 

Salem Bintalib is a former member of parliament from the Islah Party and is now a counselor to the president of the parliament.  He is a counselor to the Islah Party and head of research and study.  He has conducted research on laws, agreements and loans for Yemen and is a central figure in the effort to pass an access to information law.  He is also the executive manager of the Yemeni Parliamentarians Against Corruption (YemenPAC).

 

 

 

NOTE: This discussion will be held at IREX main offices at 2121 K Street, N.W., Suite 700 Washington, DC 20037. It is NOT at CIMA/NED

 

 

 
 



 


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